Fantasy Novels

Reaching for the End of a Story

It has been a nerve wrecking time. Taking stock of the big picture and re-arranging the important writing space. Over the last two weeks I have upgraded from the favourite armchair to a desk. I may yet haul my favourite armchair in here. The real reason for the move was to get some designated shelf space. To set up one location to find useful references. You see I am part way through writing the fourth novel in a series. It has survived a few moves and other projects in between. Now I want to give it some much needed attention.

Making a Project a Priority

After re-visiting a couple of how to write faster books for the second time. There has been a slow albeit cumbersome embrace of plotting. Or atleast the fact that a little bit of plotting helps. The main tip has been to spend five minutes writing down ideas before you write. It sort of works, on one occasion I wrote down the same amount of words for the idea as well as the scene. On another occasion I wrote five times as many words for the scene. I would love to be the person who could write down ideas and get five times as many words every time. That would be too easy, and no where near as much fun.

Finding a Moment of Calm

There is always guaranteed to be an interuption to the writing schedule. I have a few every year. It’s important to note what works best for you. So when everything settles down again you know where to start. Finding that little piece of calm to write always feels like a victory. Even if it is only one hundred words. That is more than what I began with. Sometimes a moment will be at an odd time and a notebook or a place to save an idea is handy. It beats having to remember it later and provides something to add to.

Reflection

There is one thing about plotting, it can always change. Half the time writing down ideas leads to completely different directions. You never know where it might lead, what matters most is that it helped. Writing is full of ups and downs, going sideways and in circles. It’s a journey full of interesting challenges all the way to end.

Guest Posts

Guest on River Moose Reads

Thank you so much to Sam @ River Moose Reads for letting me be a guest on her wonderful blog. Please check it out when you get the chance. Sam is devoted to her studies and somehow manages to miraculiously find time to review books. I have no idea how she does it πŸ™‚ This week Sam has a couple of my posts appearing exclusively on River Moose Reads.


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Writer Thoughts, Writing Tips

Know Your Genre

Imagine you are making a mad dash because you are running late. You see an old friend who has heard you wrote a novel and wants to know more. You don’t have long and blurt out. β€˜It’s a young adult fantasy series with dragons, wizards, and sorcery.’ Then wave goodbye. This is exactly how I describe my book to people when I am unsure if they like the genre. Guess what? Your first goal as a writer is to find out who is not your audience. When you know your genre you can whittle it down to the key bits of information. It is a starting point, like a secret code that is easily understood by your real audience. Key words in a genre can mean so much. It can help find your audience in a short space of time by relying on familiarity.

What Does a Genre Achieve?

So you have spent ages writing and are unsure about the genre of your story. The real issue with this is that you, the writer are your story’s biggest advocate. If you are unsure this can magnify the confusion many times over. A genre helps find an audience by using themes and styles that already exist. Every story may be a little different. The key is finding the familiar threads so you can explain it in a clear manner. It acts as a guide to let your audience know what to expect. More importantly it lets them know what not to expect.

Each Genre has a Style

I was wandering through a shop and saw a book with a cover that said β€˜fantasy’. I checked the blurb to make sure and it suggested fantasy. You can imagine what happened next… It was paranormal romance. My point is, you don’t have to get the exact details right just the basics. When you choose a genre your choice is there to help your audience find your story. Your tagline, blurb and book cover all become an important message to your reader. Knowing your genre can add an extra layer of information to help your audience.